Can you claim rent in Ontario? Yes, but there have been some changes. Read on…

Tax Tips & Advice

(updated for 2015 tax year)

If you rent your home, your rent payment is most likely the biggest bill you pay every month. Wouldn’t it be great if you could recover some of those funds? Depending on your tax situation you may be able to.

Ontario Trillium Benefit (OTB)

If you are a renter in the province of Ontario, your monthly rent will factor into your eligibility for the OTB. Along with your annual income and age, the rent you pay is part of the calculation for this monthly benefit. Special rules apply for certain types of rent situations such as

  • Payments to a friend or family member who is not reporting the payments as rental income on his/her tax return are not considered to be rent payments for the purpose of the OTB. So if you pay your Aunt Mary $400/month and she doesn’t report that money as rental income on her return, you cannot include those payments when applying for the OTB.
  • Students who live in residence while attending post-secondary school can apply for the OTB. The actual amount of your residence fees isn’t used for the calculation – a set value is assessed by the Province of Ontario.
  • For married or common law couples, only one spouse claims the OTB. It makes no difference which spouse makes the claim as eligibility is determined using the combined incomes of both spouses.
  • If you share accommodations with roommates, each of you can apply for the OTB. Calculate your portion of the rent only when filling out the application.

For more information, please visit the Ontario Revenue Agency’s information page {here}.


Comments (51) Leave your comment

  1. Hi Gurinder,
    The rent credit portion of the Ontario Trillium Benefit is available for lower income individuals and an income greater than $70K would exclude a taxpayer from receiving it. If your income changes in the future, and you are unsure if you qualify, fill out the ONBEN form anyway. If you do not qualify, you will be automatically excluded – no harm, no foul. There’s also an online calculator available to determine if you qualify –

    — Julie

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